6 Questions to Ask Before Choosing a Software Developer for Your Web Portal

by SOURCE WEbFEB 2018

If you’re starting a Web Portal Project, you must find the right developer. Learn the questions you should ask a developer before you hire them now.

Are you thinking about having software made for your business? If so, and this is your first time having software created for your business, you may be in for a surprise. 

If you want to dip your toe into software development, we applaud your decision. You need to brace yourself when it comes to price, however, because software development generally requires a weighty investment of money. Surveys show that the cost for creating an enterprise software application can range from $50,000 to $500,000+ depending on needs. While even the low end of that spectrum is a good amount of money, the payback you have the potential to make from a successful software application often makes the risk worthwhile. 

Whether you’re investing $50,000, $500,000 or more in software development, you’re putting a lot of money on the line. To avoid wasting your money and to increase the likelihood that your software will be successful, it’s vital for you to invest time in finding the right software developer. 

While that may sound like a task that’s easy enough, it can be a challenge to find a qualified software developer who shares your vision and understands your business and industry. Even though it can be difficult to find a software developer, it certainly isn’t impossible. 

To begin, you should ask some trusted colleagues for referrals. You should then research the software development companies that were suggested to you and check their online reviews. Based on your research, you should narrow down your list of candidates to a handful of software developers. Meeting with each software developer will be the next step in the hiring process.

Key Questions to Ask Prospective Software Developers

When you meet with a software developer, you’ll need to ask them some key questions to determine if they’re a fit for your project. Hiring the wrong developer can bring your project to an end before it even gets off the ground and wind up costing you hundreds of thousands of dollars, after all. These possibilities make figuring out if someone will be a fit even more important. 

Here are some of the key questions you should ask when you interview a person for your software development project:

May I see some of the software you’ve already created for other clients?

A successful software development company will jump at the chance to show off its past work. By looking over an software developer’s portfolio, you’ll be able to gauge the quality of their work and predict whether they’ll be successful with your software. 

If a company’s portfolio doesn’t include promising results or recognizable brands, it may be a red flag. If the company’s past achievements include award-winning software made for brands you’re familiar with, it’s a good sign.

Will you share the contact information for clients you’ve created software for in my industry?

While speaking with past clients in any industry may help you make a decision, talking to clients that compete in your industry will yield feedback that’s more relevant to you specifically. 

When you talk to an software developer’s past clients, you’ll gain valuable insight into how the developer managed deadlines and the inherent pressure that’s involved with software development. You can also learn about the developer’s communication style and how responsive the developer was to concerns raised by clients. These things will help you determine if a given developer is the right choice for your project.

Will you describe your development services, please?

You need to know what services an software development company is going to provide to bring your software to launch. Will they perform exhaustive beta testing? Do they offer any quality assurances? A trustworthy software developer will provide a full suite of development services. At a minimum, these services should include business analysis, software development, quality testing and launch.

What’s your bandwidth?

As you can imagine, software development involves many moving parts, with changes and challenges constantly on the horizon. To make sure that a software developer has the manpower and resources to juggle the many tasks involved in developing a high-quality software, you must inquire about their bandwidth. If a developer is reluctant to tell you how many people will be dedicated to your project due to non-disclosure agreements, you can try to determine if the company is already spread too thin on your own. You can search their blog and social media pages for announcements about projects and you can scour the Internet in search of any relevant press releases that mention the developer’s current projects.

How do you approach user experience?

User experience should always be the number one priority in software development. If your software ends up with a poor design and a substandard user experience, it will never achieve the popularity you’d hoped for. Be sure the software developer you choose prioritizes user experience.

Will you maintain and update my software after it’s released?

In addition to fixing bugs immediately after your software is launched, your software developer should be available to maintain your software for however long it’s available in online stores and marketplaces. Whether you want to update your software, add new features or enhance its functionality, your developer should take care of it for you long after your software is initially released. 

If you’re looking for a reliable, forward-thinking software development company, your search is over now that you’ve found Source Web Solutions, Inc. We’ve been creating web software and portals across industries for more than 10 years and we’ll be happy to do the same for you. Contact us for a free quote on our software development services today.

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